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How to Enjoy a Typical Italian Breakfast: Bar, Hotel or Home Experience

How to Enjoy a Typical Italian Breakfast: Bar, Hotel or Home Experience

Image: Typical Italian breakfast in Italy

What to expect for breakfast in Italy? The common Italian colazione is much simpler than a traditional English or American breakfast. However, we should distinguish between a typical Italian breakfast at home and the meal you can enjoy at a bar, café or bistro.

What do Italians eat for breakfast?

While “cappuccino e cornetto” (croissant in Italian) might sound like the most common first meal of the day at an Italian bar, a typical Italian breakfast varies a lot, both at the bar and at home. From different types of coffee to fresh juice to toasted bread with homemade jam and butter to porridge and muesli, Italian breakfast is diverse, colorful and makes everyone happy.

Do Italians have cake for breakfast? Yes, typically Italians have a sweet breakfast so from time to time they can also have cake or cookies in the morning, better if homemade. Usually, Italians do prefer homemade cakes and tarts such as apple pie, lemon cake or topped with jam such as the delicious tart with ricotta and visciole (sour berries), typical from Rome.

Even though I prefer a savory breakfast, when I make a cake (usually healthy and sugar-free), I like to have it for breakfast with a cup of green tea.

Image: Coffee in a typical Italian breakfast

Typical breakfast in an Italian bar

A typical Italian breakfast at a bar can simply involve cappuccino and croissant. Depending on the bar offer, there is plenty of coffee you can order in Italy. Some of the alternative drinks you can find are cappuccino made with soy milk and regular coffee or ginseng coffee, several types of coffee, caffellatte which is milk with some coffee (if you ask for a “latte” you will be given a cup with only milk), marocchino and mocaccino (coffee with milk cream) and tea. Cafes usually have also juices and smoothies, along with a larger list of teas. Different regions in Italy, different food traditions. In Turin, for example, you can order the typical bicerin coffee with milk cream.

Most Italians have also something to eat with their drink, and at a bar or coffee shop, you can choose among several pastries, cookies and pieces of cake and tarts. Obviously, a café or a bistro will have a bigger choice than a bar and you can really go crazy with your croissant with plenty of versions such as vegan, wholegrain, empty or filled with cream, chocolate or jam.

How do you order breakfast in Italy? Usually, at a bar, you decide what to have, you pay first and then you head to the counter and order showing the receipt. At a coffee shop, you will usually grab a table so you can also pay at the end before leaving.

Image: Cappuccino for breakfast in Italian bars

Traditional Italian home breakfast

At home, Italians have the most diverse breakfasts. From porridge with or without fresh fruits to homemade pancakes and cakes to yoghurt, usually, Italians have also something to eat together with their morning coffee. A pretty common breakfast is also bread, often toasted, sometimes whole-grain, with a spread of butter and jam, preferably homemade with the seasonal fruit. Some also buy specific Italian breakfast biscuits, especially for kids, that you can easily find in every supermarket. At home, we rarely have a croissant, this is a treat we allow ourselves when we go out for breakfast or when we are traveling.

Some Italians like even savory breakfasts, and I’m one of them. I don’t eat much for breakfast because I feel like starting to eat gradually after hours of night fasting. But I still have a substantial first meal of the day and it’s usually savory, including a slice of toasted rye bread or regular whole-grain wheat bread with a cream made with miso and tahini or miso and peanut butter. Sometimes, I make myself porridge with whole-grain oat flakes with fresh fruits and some nuts or soy yoghurt, and sometimes, I make my own pancakes without sugar, sweetened with dried fruits such as dates, plums or raisins. Usually, I drink green or black tea instead of coffee. Yes, I’m Italian! And yes, my Afghan husband drinks coffee instead of tea.

Image: Muesli and oat flakes for breakfast in an Italian home

On a traditional Italian breakfast, at home we also have coffee, sometimes espresso sometimes made with the moka pot, barley coffee, usually instant, or tea. Kids usually have milk with either Orzoro (soluble barley coffee) or Nesquik (soluble chocolate) and Italian breakfast cookies. Supermarkets usually have entire shelves full of breakfast biscuits for all tastes and preferences.

When we travel, we relax a bit to have a delicious Italian cornetto or piece of cake, and my husband from time to time enjoys an English breakfast with eggs and bacon.

Image: Hot chocolate as Italian breakfast foods

What’s the breakfast at hotels and B&Bs in Italy?

Italian breakfast foods at B&Bs include packaged cakes, croissants or fette biscottate (rusks) as well as single-dose jams, honey and Nutella, but often also delicious homemade cakes. Since B&Bs are usually properties where the owner lives, the local family prepares traditional Italian breakfast recipes including cakes, cookies and jams. B&B owners sometimes allow guests to make their own coffee or tea, while sometimes they prepare them themselves.

Image: Italian cornetto for breakfast in Italy

On the other hand, when booking a hotel, the Italy breakfast menu you can expect is quite richer and more diverse. At a 4 or 5-star hotel, you can expect a buffet breakfast that includes both sweet and savory options.

So from all types of Italian breakfast pastries to English and American treats such as muffins, waffles and pancakes, to toasted bread to accompany cheese, cured meat, scrambled eggs with bacon and even smoked salmon in higher-end hotels. It’s not uncommon to find also oat flakes, muesli or granola to eat with milk (cow or vegetable) or yoghurt. Drink-wise, you can order the usual coffee, cappuccino, caffè latte, hot chocolate, tea, and juices. Our breakfast at our 4-star hotel in Trento was a huge buffet showcasing just about everything from fresh fruits, yoghurt, muesli, seeds, scrambled eggs and bacon, all typed of pastries and all types of drinks.

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